New lighting toolkit gives councils the power to save cash

PIC PHIL WILKINSON 'info@philwilkinson.net'www.philwilkinson.net'01316186373 - 07740444373''Midlothian Advertiser job.''HOPEFILED , BONNYRIGG.'Youngsters Lewis Curry (13) - Black coat'Jack Millar - (13) - maroon hoodie.''Pictured with local resident Martin Graham , who raised the alarm and helped the children after they fell through ice on a local pond , helping them to safety.
PIC PHIL WILKINSON 'info@philwilkinson.net'www.philwilkinson.net'01316186373 - 07740444373''Midlothian Advertiser job.''HOPEFILED , BONNYRIGG.'Youngsters Lewis Curry (13) - Black coat'Jack Millar - (13) - maroon hoodie.''Pictured with local resident Martin Graham , who raised the alarm and helped the children after they fell through ice on a local pond , helping them to safety.

As the cost of electricity is set to double over the next ten years, an easy-to-use toolkit has today (16 February 2015) been launched to give Scotland’s local authorities real-time information on how many millions they would save by phasing in energy efficient LED street lights.

A cross Scotland, there are nearly 900,000 street lights costing local authorities £41 million in annual electricity charges. The street lights also impact on the environment by releasing 199,091 tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere each year.

Developed by the Scottish Futures Trust (SFT) and supported by the Scottish Government through its Resource Efficient Scotland (RES) programme, the toolkit allows councils to input their current street lighting data which in turn calculates what the reduced electricity usage would be if they changed to new, energy-efficient LED lighting. The toolkit also calculates what level of investment is required by the council to replace its old lights with new LED fittings, and the payback period of the loan.

With councils under constant pressure to make the best use of limited budgets, SFT is encouraging them to use the toolkit which has demonstrated in trials that the average council can save between 60-70% of their present electricity costs.