Fraserburgh cemetery bones “unusual” find

Archaeologist Alison Cameron with some of the bones and artefacts unearthed at the cemetery at Fraserburgh.
Archaeologist Alison Cameron with some of the bones and artefacts unearthed at the cemetery at Fraserburgh.

The bones uncovered at a Fraserburgh cemetery date from the 13 century or even earlier, archaeologists believe.

The remains are that of one young female, one male and one unidentified person and were found at Kirkton Cemetery by grave-diggers earlier this month in an a part of the grounds not yet designated for burial.

Alison Cameron, who led the dig said: “It’s quite unusual.

“We seem to think that bones are found all the time but that area had been a field up until 1997.”

The archaeologist said that a bones had been moved sometime in the 20th century and placed in a trench along with bottles also from that period.

The Aberdeen-based archaeologist expert the bones may be early burials from a 13th century church.

She said: “The church that is there has been there since the 13th century and bones could be from a burial then -or it could be even earlier than that.”

Ms Cameron believes that it is possible that other bones of archaeological interest may be on the church grounds and could be unearthed.

The team are looking at a number of options including doing a geophysical survey on the grounds - meaning they could detect for bones underground without digging.

The bones were uncovered at the cemetery earlier in the month with the police called initially to investigate the find.

However they soon ruled out anything suspicious after discussions with bone experts including Ms Cameron.

Further studies of the area are expected to be carried out in the coming weeks.