Visually impaired Gardenstown artist continues to paint

A visually impaired artist from Gardenstown will have pieces included in a national charity’s art exhibition next month.

Yvonne Dolloway continues to produce work despite being affected by macular disease and will now feature in ‘Peripheral Visions’ which takes place at the Menier Gallery in London from September 4-7.

The exhibition is being held by the Macular Disease Society to mark the charity’s 25th anniversary and celebrate the artistic talent of people
affected by sight loss.

Age-related macular degeneration affects the central vision and is the most common cause of sight loss in the UK.

There are many other forms of macular disease, including
juvenile macular dystrophies.

In addition to being included in the exhibition, pictures by Ms Dolloway will feature in a 2013 calendar being produced by the
Society.

Ms Dolloway said: “On moving to Aberdeenshire 3 years ago, I was diagnosed with Doynes Dystrophy, a rare form of Macular
Degeneration.

 “I have always wanted to paint and on my move to Scotland I started. My husband, with his belief in me, decided that I could work from photographs downloaded to the computer, then transferred to a 46 inch screen on which I can zoom in and
out. 

“I still work like this for local scenery, but I had the privilege in October of spending two weeks in Ireland with International artist
Philip Gray.

“Philip believes the subconscious is like a camera, there is so much locked in there, that we all dream, so there is our material. In Ireland I had to work without any aids, out of Ireland came my floral collection.”

The exhibition was open to artists with macular disease or to those whose work furthers understanding of central vision loss. Peripheral vision is not affected by macular disease and so many artists continue to work even after developing the condition.

Helen Jackman, Chief Executive of the Macular Disease Society, said:
“We are very impressed by Yvonne’s work and we’re delighted to be able to include examples at our 25th anniversary exhibition.

“We hope that Peripheral Visions will help to raise awareness of macular disease and further people’s understanding of the condition, as well as celebrating the considerable talent of artists affected by central vision
loss.”

For more information on the exhibition or macular disease, please contact the Macular Disease Society’s helpline on 0300 3030 111 or email help@maculardisease.org.

The charity are also offering people the chance to celebrate its 25th anniversary by holding a tea party. More information on how to organise your own tea party to celebrate the occasion can be found on the macular Disease Society’s website at
www.maculardisease.org.

The Macular Disease Society are a charity registered in England and Wales (1001198) and Scotland
(SC042015).